Helping to protect our customers

EDF Energy takes fraud and crime seriously and we want to do as much as we can to help protect our customers. That’s why we’ve put together this information.

The security information we hold about you is very important to both of us. When we contact you, we need to make sure we’re speaking the right person – the account holder or nominated representative – and that’s why we spend a few moments checking your identity so we know that you’re authorised to discuss your account, and not a fraudster.

Reporting fraud

If you've been a victim of fraud or a phishing scam email then report it to Action Fraud.

Five things to help you

1

Visits to your home or phone call identification

Most of the meter readers working on our behalf are from Morrison Data Services (MDS). They’ll wear branded uniforms and will always have ID. If you feel you need to check the identity of a meter reader, call MDS on 0191 201 3791. We do use other meter readers too, so call EDF Energy on 0800 096 9000 if you’re concerned. There’s also a password scheme for customers for added security. This can be used when we are ringing you or if we need to visit your home. For your reassurance our smart meter installers will contact you before they arrive.

2
  1. Be cautious
    Just because someone knows your bank details it doesn't mean they're genuine, so be mindful of who you trust. If you feel safe to, ask them questions too so they can verify their identity.
     
  2. Check, check and check again
    If in doubt, take a moment to step back from the situation to think about what's really going on. If something doesn't feel right or seems wrong, it's usually right to question it.
     
  3. Know where to go
    There are organisations that provide advice and support. Anything suspicious can be reported to Action Fraud. EDF Energy support the Take Five initiative.

Verifying your identity

We need to make sure we're speaking to authorised account holders so we will ask you a couple of security questions. We will not ask for account passwords or security codes related to bank accounts or other payment cards. We'll only disclose account details to the account holder when we've verified their identity.

3

Be cautious

Just because someone knows your bank details, it doesn't mean they're genuine, so be mindful of who you trust and don't be afraid to ask them questions to verify their identity. 

4

Check, check and check again

If in doubt, take five minutes to step back from the situation to think about what's really going on. If something doesn't feel right or seems wrong, it's usually right to question it. 

5

Know where to go

There are organisations that provide advice and guidance. EDF Energy supports the Take Five and Cyber Aware campaigns and you can find practical help on their websites. Anything suspicious can be reported to Action Fraud.

Worried about phishing scam emails?

Phishing is a method that fraudsters use to obtain personal information from you, such as usernames, passwords or bank details. They then use these for illegal purposes, for example to steal money from your account or to clone your identity.

Typically, phishing is done by sending an email that looks like it’s from a legitimate source in order to convince you to hand over personal information. To improve your online security and avoid falling foul of phishing scam emails, we’ve put together some information on how to recognise them and what action you can take. You can also watch this useful video.

Letter


Check the subject line

If the subject line seems unusual, requests information, offers a reward or threatens consequences, this is probably an attempted phishing scam email or spam. Ignore it unless you’re certain you know who it’s from.

People


Make sure the sender is trustworthy

Be suspicious of emails from unknown senders, and remember they could pose as someone from a trusted company to make it more likely that you’ll respond to their request.

Financial or government organisations don’t send unsolicited emails that request the users to open a link or attachment, or provide information. Emails like these are probably phishing attempts.

Speech bubble


Check the greeting

Generic greetings are a strong indication of phishing attempts. However, be aware that specific greetings don’t mean the email is safe. Attackers can find out your name or other personal information in order to create a more convincing lure, known as spear phishing.

Look up


Examine the body copy of the message

If there’s a sense of urgency in the email which requires you to ‘act now’, it’s likely to be a phishing email. If the text is badly written or has spelling mistakes, this could also be a sign. Remember – EDF Energy will never ask you to disclose your password and you should never provide personal information if requested. It could be an energy bill scam.

Paper clip


Don't open attachments until you know it's genuine

Be wary of instructions to open an attachment or link within the email. Only open these if you’re sure the sender and email are genuine. It’s always best to type the URL directly into the address bar. 

Top tips to stay safe

  1. Check the sender email address
  2. Never give out personal information
  3. Report the phishing scam email to the organisation it's supposedly from
  4. Don’t open attachments or click on any links from unknown sources

For more information about online security, visit Get Safe Online or contact Citizens Advice