Government grants for electric cars

Find out what help is available from the UK government, for people and businesses looking to switch to clean, zero emission electric vehicles

Woman about to charge a Volkswagen e-Golf

Thinking of making the switch to an electric car? The good news is the UK’s Office for Zero Emission Vehicles (OZEV) provide a number of government electric car grants to help an individual or business purchase an electric vehicle or install charging points.

Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme (EVHS)

Electric car charging point for a new home

There are now more than 14,400 public electric car charging point locations in the UK and that number is growing all the time.

The UK Government is pushing for electric car chargers to be installed in newly built homes and a huge expansion of public charging infrastructure for when you are out on the road. However, support is also available for EV drivers who want to install a car charger at home.

The Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme, often shortened to EVHS, is designed to help plug-in vehicle owners offset some of the upfront costs they face.

If you have a home with off-street parking suitable for an electric car charger, and an eligible electric vehicle, you could get £350 off the cost of buying and installing an electric charger.

There are some rules around the types of electric car and electric car charger that qualify for the grant, such as using an approved installer, which is detailed in the FAQs below.

Homecharge Scheme FAQs

How do I know if I have the right EV to qualify for the electric car home charger grant?

All vehicles that have been approved as ultra-low emission vehicles by the Office for Zero Emission Vehicles are eligible for the Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme. check out the full list of the vehicles that are eligible for the plug-in car grant.

Do all electric car drivers qualify for a home charger grant?

The Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme provides up to £350 for drivers who have bought, or leased, a new or second hand eligible electric vehicle on or after 1 October 2016, as long as they have not claimed against a previous Government chargepoint scheme.

This includes:

  • Drivers assigned an eligible company car for at least six months
  • Individuals who lease an eligible vehicle for at least six months
  • Employees who have leased an eligible electric car as part of a salary-sacrifice scheme
  • Individuals who are named by their employer as the primary user of an eligible electric vehicle for at least six months
  • Drivers who can prove that they have ordered an eligible electric car

Who can’t claim for an electric car home charger grant?

The grant isn’t available to drivers of electric cars who:

  • Are not on the list of eligible EVs, or whose car is registered outside of the UK;
  • Drivers who sometimes use an electric vehicle, but are not listed as the main driver;
  • Individuals who drive or lease an electric car for less than six months;
  • Drivers who are borrowing an electric vehicle from friends or family;
  • Drivers who only have access to an electric vehicle through a car club;
  • Drivers who want to claim for a second home charger but don’t have two eligible vehicles.

How do I find an eligible electric car charge point and installer?

Lists of approved electric chargers, and authorised EV charger installers, are publicly available from the Office for Zero Emission Vehicles Website.

 

Can I get help to charge my electric car at home if I don’t have my own off-street parking?

If you do not have your own off-street parking, your Local Authority may be able to help via a central Government grant.

Is the electric vehicle home charge grant available upfront, or do I have to pay for installation and claim the money back?

Once all the relevant paperwork is completed, an authorised electric car charge point installer will claim the 75% (capped at £350) on your behalf. You will need to agree on how you meet the remaining cost with the installer before the work is carried out.

Is there a limit to the number of EV chargers I can claim for?

The Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme (EVHS) grant can be made available for a maximum of two eligible electric cars at a single domestic property if all terms and conditions are met. However, your installer must speak to your local Distribution Network Operator before installing two EV chargers, or a second home charge point at a single address.

Can I get a grant to have a three-pin socket EV charger installed at my home?

This type of electric car charger is not eligible for a grant.

How do I find out further information about funding to install home car chargers?

Your home electric car charge point supplier or installer should be able to answer any questions you have or you can contact OZEV at Chargepoint.Grants@olev.gsi.gov.uk

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Looking for a smart home charger?

The Pod Point Solo Smart Home Charger is now available through EDF.

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Workplace Charging Scheme (WCS) grant

The Workplace Charging Scheme, or WCS, can provide financial support towards the up-front costs of buying and installing electric car chargers for many businesses, charities and public sector organisations.

It’s a voucher-based scheme which, like the home car charger grant, can cover up to 75 per cent of the cost of buying and installing electric car chargers, up to a maximum of £350 for each socket. The grant is available for up to a maximum of 40 sockets..

Discounts for businesses installing an electric car charger at work

Any business, charity or organisation can apply for funding for up to 40 chargers across all of the sites they operate.

As with the home car charge point grant scheme, there are some rules around the types of electric car charger points that qualify for the grant and you must use an approved installer.

If your application is successful you’ll be sent a unique voucher code, which is valid for four months from the date it’s issued.

This handy FAQ section below should help you further

Workplace Charging Scheme FAQs

Who can apply for the Workplace Charging Scheme?

Any business, charity, or public sector organisation with a Companies House Reference Number can apply for a government grant if they can declare a need for electric car charging equipment, or an intent to encourage EV use among their staff or fleet. You should be the owner of the property where the charger will be installed, or have the landlord’s consent to do so, and you’ll need dedicated off-street parking.

What sort of sort of electric car charger should I install at work?

EDF Energy has a range of electric charging options to suit every business.

For more information about the types of electric car charger available talk to an approved installer or have a look at the information provided by the Energy Saving Trust.

How do I find an eligible electric car charger and installer?

Lists of approved electric chargers, and authorised EV charger installers, are publicly available from the Office for Zero Emission Vehicles Website.

What’s the process once I apply for a WCS, or Workplace Charging Scheme, grant?

Once you’ve applied for your grant online, a voucher will be generated, which is valid for four months. Your approved installer will then complete the work on your electric car charger and submit a claim on the WCS portal. They then receive the grant of up to 75 per cent, to a maximum of £350, towards the cost.

Is there a limit to the number of EV chargers I can claim for at work?

Any business, charity or organisation can apply for funding for up to 40 electric car charging sockets across all of the sites they operate, providing all eligibility requirements are met.

How do I find out further information about funding to install car chargers at work?

Your workplace car charger supplier or installer should be able to answer any questions you have or alternatively, further information is available at www.gov.uk/government/collections/government-grants-for-low-emission-vehicles#workplace-charging-scheme

Does my business or staff member have to possess a plug-in vehicle to qualify for the WCS grant?

No. You will be asked to declare either a need for electric vehicle charging infrastructure or an intention to encourage uptake amongst your staff and/or fleet.

On-street residential chargepoint scheme (ORCS)

electric cars plugged in on street

Although most electric car owners will want to charge their EV at home, many drivers, especially those in cities, will not have a private drive or garage to do so.

The On-street Residential Chargepoint Scheme, also known as ORCS, provides grant funding for local authorities towards the cost of installing on-street residential electric car chargers.

The scheme, run by the Energy Saving Trust (EST) for OLEV, has an allocated pot of money available to local authorities on a first come, first served, basis.

Plug-in car grant (PICG)

couple buying an electric car from dealer

You can get a discount on the purchase price of a brand new low-emission vehicle through a grant given to vehicle dealerships and manufacturers by the government.

Cars that have CO2 emissions of less than 50g/km and can travel at least 70 miles (112km) without any emissions at all can qualify - not all low-emission vehicles will get a grant, only those that have been approved by the government are eligible.

The dealer will include the grant in the vehicle’s purchase price up to the value of 35 per cent of the price, to a maximum of £2,500.

Cars such as the DS3 Crossback E-Tense, Hyundai IONIQ PremiumMG ZS EVNissan Leaf N-Connecta, and Skoda Citigo-e iV all qualify.

For mopeds and motorbikes that have no CO2 emissions and can travel at least 50km (31 miles) between charges, can qualify for Government grants up to 20 per cent of the purchase price, capped at a maximum of £1,500.

Small electric vans with the best CO2 emissions, such as the Nissan e-NV200 and Renault Kangoo ZE, can qualify for a grant up to 35 per cent of the purchase price, to a maximum of £3,000, while large vans like the Peugeot e-Expert can qualify for 20 per cent of the purchase price, capped at £6,000.

While the cleanest taxi can also qualify for a Government grant of up to 20 per cent of the purchase price, capped at £7,500.

A full list of eligible vehicles is available from the GOV.UK website.

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