27 May 21
Customers

Charging back in time: British motorists can drive a mile for just 1p for the first time since 1972

Electric Vehicles are taking British motorists back in time, with drivers now able to travel a mile by car on just one penny of fuel for the first time since the early 1970s
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  • Electric vehicle (EV) tariff allows motorists to drive for just a penny a mile for the first time since 1972[1]
  • EDF’s GoElectric 35 EV tariff offers Britain’s lowest off-peak rate for overnight charging - equivalent to just 1.3p/mile[2] for a typical EV - allowing motorists to cut fuel costs to levels not seen in nearly 50 years
  • Despite the huge savings to be made - up to £808.03 per year in fuel; over a third (38%) of motorists are still not aware that it’s cheaper to fully charge an EV than to fill a petrol/diesel car with a full tank of fuel


Electric Vehicles (EV) are taking British motorists back in time, with drivers now able to travel a mile by car on just one penny of fuel for the first time since the early 1970s.

EDF’s GoElectric 35 EV tariff offers an off-peak charging rate of just 4.5p / kwh - the lowest in Britain and equivalent to just 1.3p per mile for a typical EV.  This means it’s possible for British drivers to travel for a penny a mile for the first time since 1972, when petrol cost  35p per gallon, the Ford Cortina was the country’s most popular car, flares were all the rage and T.Rex and Slade were topping the charts.

Despite the huge cost savings available, consumer research from EDF[3], Britain’s biggest generator of zero carbon electricity[4], reveals drivers are still in the dark about the benefits of switching to an EV. The average motorist estimates it would cost 34p to travel a mile in an EV, with over a third (38%) not aware that it’s cheaper to fully charge an electric vehicle than to fill a petrol/diesel car with a full tank of fuel[5].

The research of 2,000 motorists across the UK showed that drivers believe it costs an average of £25.80 to fully charge an EV - £20 more than the true cost using the EDF GoElectric 35 tariff[6].

With motorists expected to spend £941.21 a year on fuel, following the return to average annual mileage figures post-pandemic, making the switch to go electric could save the average motorist up to £808.03 per year in fuel - a staggering £51,713.92 over the course of their lifetime[7]. Two thirds (66%) of those who learnt it is cheaper to charge an EV than to fill-up a petrol/diesel car stated they would be more likely to consider making the switch.

With 49% of motorists put off switching to an EV due to the purchase cost and 43% believing they are more expensive to maintain, the significant fuel savings to be made over time could break down these barriers. However, only a quarter of motorists (26%) are aware that making the switch to an EV would save them money in the long run.

Despite the lack of understanding of the cost savings offered by EVs, motorists are increasingly attracted by their environmental benefit. Over half (56%) have made, or are considering making, the switch to an EV as they believe they are more environmentally friendly and 35% believe that an EV will make them feel that they are ‘doing their bit’ towards hitting the government’s target of Net Zero carbon emissions.

Currently the collective ‘carbon footprint’ of petrol and diesel cars on UK roads is fourteen times what it would be if all those vehicles were to switch to electric by 2030. With 32.4 million petrol and diesel cars on UK roads, these emit around 69.5 million tonnes of carbon dioxide per year, when driven an average of 7,600 miles. By comparison, the same amount of electric cars would add less than 5 million tonnes of CO2 to the environment by 2030 - a fall of 92 per cent, reducing Britain’s overall carbon footprint by more than 10 per cent[8].

Philippe Commaret, Managing Director for Customers at EDF commented: “As Britain’s biggest generator of zero carbon electricity, we’re committed to making it as easy as possible for motorists to make the switch to an EV. Our GoElectric 35 tariff offers the cheapest off-peak rate in Britain, providing drivers with the cheapest travel costs seen in decades at just a penny a mile.

“Combined with the dramatic environmental benefits that could be achieved if we were all to switch to an electric vehicle over the next ten years, there has never been a better time to consider going electric.” 

EDF’s Go Electric 35 Tariff offers Britain’s lowest off-peak rate for cheaper overnight charging, allowing drivers to fully charge an EV for less than a fiver[9]. The 100% zero-carbon renewable tariff offers 35 hours of off-peak energy per week at just 4.5p/kWh (5 hours off-peak between 12-5am GMT daily). Through its partnerships with Drive Electric and Pod Point, EDF makes it easy to switch to electric motoring, providing customers with access to a range of electric vehicle offerings from chargers for home, electric vehicle leasing, and three different tariff options to suit their lifestyle.

For further information about EDF’s range of tariff options, please visit: www.edfenergy.com/electric-cars/tariffs

 

For more information:

EDF Media Team
24-hour press line: +44 (0)1452 652233
media@edfenergy.com 

 

Notes to Editors:

  1. Calculations:
  • EDF Go Electric tariff off-peak rate: 4.5p/kwh
  • Peugeot E-2008 electricity consumption* = 290Wh / mile
  • 1000Wh/ 290Wh = 3.448kWh/mile
  • 4.5p / 3.448 = 1.30p per mile

*https://ev-database.uk/car/1206/Peugeot-e-2008-SUV

  • 1972 petrol price per/gallon = 35p**
  • Average mile per gallon for a Ford Cortina MK3 (2000E)= 27MPG***
  • 35p / 27 = 1.29p

**https://www.jstor.org/stable/43865150?read-now=1&seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

***Ford Press Office

  1. For further information about EDF’s Go Electric 35 Tariff, please visit:  www.edfenergy.com/electric-cars/tariffs.The Go Electric 35 Tariff enables motorists to fully charge their EV for less than £5 (based on a mini electric 32.6 kW battery using a 7kW home charger).
  2. Research conducted by Opinium of 2,000 car drivers between 21st to 26th April 2021.
  3. UK Fuel Mix disclosure information, published by BEIS, acknowledges electricity from wind, nuclear and solar fuel produces zero carbon dioxide emissions at the point of generation” https://www.edfenergy.com/zero-carbon
  4. When asked which would be cheaper to fill with fuel / fully charge between a Vauxhall Corsa 1.2 SE Petrol and a Vauxhall Corsa-E,  38% were not aware that it’s cheaper to fully charge an electric vehicle than to fill a petrol/diesel car with a full tank of fuel.
  5. See point 2
  6. Savings per annum/lifetime calculated using:
  1. Carbon footprint calculations based on emissions from vehicles being driven, and do not take into account the C02 impact from the manufacture of the vehicles Formula for calculations based on:
  • Number of licensed petrol/diesel cars on UK roads: 32,493,300
  • Average KM driven per car: 12,160
  • For petrol / diesel cars, average CO2 kg emitted per KM: 0.176  [based on BEIS (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) annual passenger car emissions in UK (2017)]
  • For Electric Cars, average C02 kg emitted per KM: 0.0125 [based on a future national grid carbon intensity of 50g/kWh – as recommended to achieve Net Zero by the Committee on Climate Change in its 2019 Progress Report to Parliament, and an EV propulsion efficiency of 0.25 kWh/km)

2030 is when the Committee on Climate Change has recommended a grid intensity of 50g/kWh be reached by in order to reach net zero by 2050

  1. Based on a mini electric 32.6 kW battery using a 7kW home charger.

About EDF  

EDF is helping Britain achieve Net Zero by leading the transition to a cleaner, low emission electric future and tackling climate change. We are Britain’s biggest generator of zero carbon electricity, meeting around one-fifth of the country’s demand and supplying millions of customers with electricity and gas. 

With around 5 million accounts, EDF is one of the largest suppliers to British homes and businesses and a leading supplier of innovative energy solutions that are helping businesses become more energy independent. All of our home customers get energy tariffs backed by zero carbon electricity as standard. 

We generate low carbon electricity from eight nuclear power stations, more than thirty onshore wind farms and two offshore wind farms, and operate one of Britain’s biggest battery storage units, one gas and one coal power station, thousands of EV charge-points, and combined heat and power plants. Wind, nuclear and solar all produce electricity that is zero carbon at the point of generation and have similar emissions over the build, run and retire lifecycles. 

EDF is leading the UK's nuclear renaissance with the construction of a new nuclear power station at Hinkley Point C, and is leading the development of plans for a replica at Sizewell C in Suffolk. Hinkley Point C and Sizewell C will provide low carbon electricity to meet 14% of UK demand and power around 12 million homes.  

EDF is one of the UK’s largest investors in renewables, with 1GW of renewable generation in operation and over 4GW in construction, planning and development across a range of technologies including onshore and offshore wind, solar and battery storage. We are constructing our largest offshore wind farm in Britain – the 450 MW Neart na Gaoithe project in Scotland which will be ready in 2023. 

Our energy services business, Imtech, is one of the largest technical service providers in the UK and Ireland. 

EDF is part of EDF Group, the world’s biggest electricity generator. In the UK we employ around 13,000 people.