27 May 21
Renewables

EDF Renewables Ireland announces plans for 100MW wind farm in Mayo

Green Rigg Wind Farm
View | Download (11.08 MB)

EDF Renewables Ireland is announcing plans to develop a 100MW wind farm to the south of Bellacorick in Mayo. The proposed project, which could  consist of up to 25 turbines and power more than 60,000 homes, will be located in a forested area to the northeast of Slieve Carr, approximately 8km southeast of Bangor Erris.

The project team is currently gathering wind data and mapping the environmental constraints on site which will be used to create a preliminary wind turbine layout. Detailed environmental studies will also be carried out at the site, including ecology, noise, landscape and visual assessments. The results of these studies, together with feedback gathered in consultation with local communities, will be used to determine the final wind farm layout and number of turbines.

EDF Renewables Ireland intends to submit a planning application and an Environmental Impact Assessment Report in support of the project to An Bord Pleanála in early 2022.

Subject to planning permission, the wind farm is expected to be operational in 2028. A Community Benefit Fund commensurate with the size of the final project will be established to provide funding for local community initiatives and activities.

EDF Renewables Ireland is committed to keeping local people informed about its projects and a number of public consultation events will take place as the Kilsallagh Wind Farm progresses. These will be either online or in a local venue, depending on Covid-19 restrictions.

Commenting on the announcement, Kevin Daly, Head of Development at EDF Renewables Ireland, said: “Kilsallagh Wind Farm will make a positive contribution to Ireland’s efforts to tackle the climate crisis. We look forward to working closely with residents and the community in Mayo and the County Council to keep them updated on progress and the benefits this project will bring to the local area.”

However with Ireland’s renewable energy capacity set to increase rapidly in the coming years, he also highlighted a key challenge in meeting Ireland’s goal of increasing the share of electricity generated by renewables to 70% by 2030:

“The west of Ireland is home to some of the best wind conditions in the country – but the absence of sufficient transmission infrastructure is a big challenge when it comes to harnessing this potential. More will need to be done to ensure Ireland’s grid system can accommodate the low-carbon energy that is needed to fight climate change and power our lives.”

 


 

Notes to Editors
*Load factors based on the five year rolling averages on unchanged configuration basis using Table 6.5 of ‘Digest of UK Energy Statistics’ - latest figures as per July 2020 release. Based upon the average domestic electricity consumption per home (temperature corrected) per the Energy Consumption in the UK (published July 2020, Table C9 of ECUK: Consumption data tables).

For further information please contact:

David Clancy, External Affairs Manager, EDF Renewables Ireland
Email: david.clancy@edf-re.ie
Phone: 087 248 2495

About EDF Renewables Ireland

EDF Renewables Ireland is part of one of the world’s largest electricity companies and our investment and innovation in renewable energy projects is reducing costs for consumers and bringing significant benefits to communities.

EDF Renewables Ireland’s team has a wealth of experience in bringing complex development projects to fruition, across onshore and offshore wind, solar PV and battery storage technology, and is supported by more than 300 colleagues in the UK.

Last year we acquired 50% of Codling Wind Park, a major offshore wind farm which will be located off the coast of Co. Wicklow, with a dedicated team who have begun developing the project, and 100% of Wexford Solar, which includes eight solar projects across Ireland. In the UK we have an operating portfolio of 37 wind farms (together totalling almost 1GW).

EDF Renewables operates in more than 20 countries around the world.