International Women’s Day at EDF Energy

To mark this year’s International Women’s Day, we have put the spotlight on various EDF Energy role models, some senior and some just starting their careers. Each one contributes to our vision of being an efficient, responsible electricity company and champion of low-carbon growth. Read on to find out how we're supporting #BalanceForBetter. 

Simone Rossi, Chief Executive Officer Statement of Support

For me #BalanceForBetter means I have personally committed to work with my peers in an Energy Leaders Coalition run by POWERful Women, engaging with other CEOs across the Energy Sector.  Our current focus is to support more women entering our industry and encouraging the progression of those women already working with us.  We are looking at really understanding and overcoming the barriers to progression women tell us they face and as a senior group holding each other accountable for closing our Gender Pay Gap. 

Our employees share their best career advice

Emma Betts-Gray, Generation Supply Chain Specialist

Ee Jane Low, Mechanical Engineer in Fuel Route Systems

Career advice from women working in the energy industry

Women in Energy

Energy UK invited a number of women working across the energy sector to share their advice on starting a career in the industry. 

Watch their top tips, including advice from some of our employees. 

We asked our employees how they are going to help accelerate gender parity

 

#BalanceForBetter

Read how our employees are challenging perceptions and pursuing their dream STEM careers

Beth Thomas, Chemistry Engineer in Nuclear Operations

What attracted you to a role in the nuclear industry?
Heysham 2 Power Station has always been where I aspired to build a career. I spent my work experience at the station and whilst I had a very exciting week, I remember very vividly the day I spent with the then Operations Manager, Gail Brannick.

I remember going to a large meeting and I sat opposite Gail. I remember listening to her intently but understanding none of the endless acronyms she used. She was the only woman at that table that day, and I remember being incredibly inspired by her technical knowledge and how she held the room. Later that afternoon I quizzed Gail on her career path and I frantically made mental notes of how I could follow in her footsteps. 

Twelve years later, I am now a Chemistry Engineer within Operations Department. Whilst I work in a very diverse team, I still remember that meeting with Gail when I find myself sat in a meeting of my own where I am the only female. Thankfully, this is slowly becoming a rare occurrence and it fills me with joy when I do look around the room and there are a number of female faces looking back at me. 

 

Dr Nancy McLean, Offshore Wind Development Manager

How long have you worked in renewables?
I’ve worked in the industry for more than 15 years. I spent six years consenting onshore wind projects before transitioning to offshore wind projects around nine years ago.

Eventually, I was Head of Offshore for Natural Power which involved everything from site feasibility, to environmental assessments and consent management, to helping to develop an asset management competency within the consultancy. I’ve been with EDF Renewables UK for a couple of months. 

What is your advice on becoming part of the industry?
Get involved. There’s so much information online you can read about, so do your homework and then find people in the industry to talk to. We are a very friendly bunch! You then need to look for opportunities and grasp them. Finding out as much as possible will give you the confidence in yourself and the contribution you can make before making the leap. And there are not enough women involved, particularly in offshore wind.

Find out how we're inspiring more young people to study STEM subjects

Pretty Curious

Inspiring a generation of girls to discover the future through STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics). 

SmartSTEMs

Working with SmartSTEMs we want to challenge perceptions and see people from a bigger variety of backgrounds take up STEM studies and careers. 

pretty curious support logos